Crowell Gallery

September 2020 in the Crowell Gallery

“Honoring an Everyday Object” by Martha Werman. 

September 1 – 30, Artist reception, Friday September 4, 4 – 6 pm, outside.

The Crowell Gallery is pleased to share the work of Martha Werman throughout the month of September.  Visitors should expect to see work spanning a number of years, showcasing a variety of media and method.  Werman’s journey through the arts began in Scandinavia in 1967. working as a choreographer, teacher, and performer of modern dance, and owned a small dance school in Trondheim, Norway.   In the early 90’s in Cambridge, MA, she belonged to “Reclamation Artists”, a group of artists and designers producing temporary installations in vacant lots in Greater Boston. 

“Some of the work presented in the show is from class assignments, others are for pleasure.  Or rather, I should say, it is all for pleasure, I could not live happily without it.  Watercolors date from 1996 and acrylics (decorative aspect) from 1998 on.  I received my Certificate for Decorative Painting from RISD in 2007.  My work in oil began in 2011 when I took painting classes at Mass College of Art and Design with Catherine Kehoe and Nancy McCarthy.   I now study with Jason Alden at the Drawing Studio, Brattleboro, taking drawing and attending open studio for critique on my work.”

“I find I use my eye continuously in my environment:  the interiors of houses, walls, floors, stairs, and plants, even desiccated vegetables, all become elements of geometry enhanced by shadow and light.  Random juxtapositions catch my attention.  What I choose to paint becomes exciting, as in creating a concept and nurturing it (e.g. making a series) or, recently, when drawing/painting portraits.  I challenge myself to share with the viewer the novelty of such an image to awaken in him or her a new perspective.”

2020 Gallery Schedule

  • January – Jim Tober & Carol Hendrickson – collage, anthropologists, print
  • February  – David Parker – photography
  • March – Bill Dixon – Honey Bee’s Educational Displays, photography
  • April – 
  • May – 
  • June – Tiffany Soukop and Chris Brader – wildlife photography
  • July – Tiffany Soukop and Chris Brader – wildlife photography
  • August – Gianna Robinson – painting
  • September – Martha Werman – painting
  • October – Greg Moschetti – acrylic landscape
  • November – Dara Carlton – wildlife photographry
  • December – Alice Freeman – pastel, watercolor cartoons

Interested in exhibiting your art at the Crowell Gallery? Email crowellartgallery@gmail.com for information.

Gallery History

The Crowell Gallery at the Moore Free Library in Newfane, VT was opened to the public on September 2, 2000. It houses an outstanding collection of contemporary Southern Vermont artists. The permanent collection is on view each winter (usually in January and/or February). For the rest of the year, the gallery hosts special monthly exhibits by local artists. The gallery also serves as a venue for public programs and meetings.

Robert and Muriel Crowell funded the renovation of the Moore family’s 1890 post and beam barn. The work was performed by local artisans Dan and Gary MacArthur. A gift in 2004 from the Wolf Kahn and Emily Mason Foundation provided tensor lighting for the gallery.

About Robert L. Crowell

Robert L. (Bob) Crowell, former head of the Thomas Y. Crowell Company (which later became part of Harper Collins Publishers), was the grandson of the company’s eponymous founder. Thomas Y. Crowell began publishing books in 1876 and was the first U.S. publisher of Tolstoy and Gogol. Bob joined the company as a salesman in 1931, was elected treasurer in 1937, and rose to head the company in 1938. Under his leadership, the company published Roget’s International Thesaurus, the Frank Heller detective series and numerous art and children’s books.

Bob served as a trustee of the Moore Free Library from 1976 to 2001 and was President of the board for five of those years. As the Moore Free Library’s primary benefactor, he funded scholarship programs, literary awards, and library renovations. He passed away June 29, 2001.